Touch Technologies Timeline

In this post I'll try to enumerate all the touch technologies by year, it is an hard work and is still in progress so if you want to contribute just ping me at gianpaolo.santopaolo {at} softwarelab.it

   

  • 1965

E.A. Johnson described his work on capacitive touch screens in a short article which is published in 1965

"Touch Display - A novel input/output device for computers".. doi:10.1049/el:19650200.

     

  • 1967

Johnson in an article published in described more fully his toughts with photographs and diagrams

"Touch Displays: A Programmed Man-Machine Interface". doi:10.1080/00140136708930868 

Johnson, 1967

   

  • 1968

A description of the applicability of the touch technology for air traffic control was described in an article published in 1968.

Orr, N.W.; Hopkins, V.D. (1968). "The Role of Touch Display in Air Traffic Control". The Controller 7: 7–9.

   

  • 1972

At the University of Illinois a new system named PLATO IV was ready for operation. The PLATO IV terminal was a major innovation. It included Bitzer's orange plasma display invention which incorporated both memory and bitmapped graphics into one display. This plasma display included fast vector line drawing capability and ran at 1260 baud, rendering 60 lines or 180 characters per second. The display was a 512×512 bitmap, with both character and vector plotting done by hardwired logic. Users could provide their own characters to support rudimentary bitmap graphics. Compressed air powered a piston-driven microfiche image selector that permitted colored images to be projected on the back of the screen under program control. The PLATO IV display also included a 16×16 grid infrared touch panel allowing students to answer questions by touching anywhere on the screen.

It was developed for the PLATO Computer Assisted Instruction system, which was deployed in schools throughout the state. The technology was commercialized by Carroll Touch. which was founded in 1973.

The PLATO IV touchscreen terminal.

   

  • 1973

Frank Beck and Bent Stumpe, engineers from CERN, developed a transparent touch screen in the early 1970s and it was manufactured by CERN and put to use in 1973. This touchscreen was based on Bent Stumpe's work at a television factory in the early 1960s.

The prototype x-y mutual capacitance touchscreen (left) developed at CERN in 1977

The self-capacitance screen (right), also developed by Stumpe at CERN

The prototype x-y mutual capacitance touchscreen (left) developed at CERN in 1977 by Bent Stumpe, a Danish electronics engineer, for the control room of CERN's accelerator SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron). This was a further development of the self-capacitance screen (right), also developed by Stumpe at CERN in 1972.

   

  • 1975

A resistive touch screen was developed by American inventor G. Samuel Hurst who received US patent #3,911,215 on Oct. 7, 1975. The first version was produced in 1982.

The company was the Elographics, Inc

First generation of AccuTouch curved touchscreen from EloTouch.

   

   

  • 1982

Multi-touch technology began in 1982, when the University of Toronto's Input Research Group developed the first human-input multi-touch system, using a frosted-glass panel with a camera placed behind the glass. In 1985, the University of Toronto group including Bill Buxton developed a multi-touch tablet that used capacitance rather than bulky camera-based optical sensing systems

Multitouch tablet concept

   

The Natural User Interface Era

Bill Buxton's project is definitely the start of the Natural User Interface era even if the term NUI have to wait more than 15 years before to be heard.In my memory and in my research this is definitely the firs NUI application ever developed.

   

  • 1983

The HP-150 from 1983 was one of the world's earliest commercial touchscreen computers. Similar to the PLATO IV system , the touch technology used employed infrared transmitters and receivers mounted around the bezel of its 9" Sony Cathode Ray Tube (CRT), which detected the position of any non-transparent object on the screen.

HP 150

   

  • 1986

    The first graphical point of sale software was demonstrated on the 16-bit Atari 520ST color computer in 1986. It featured a color touchscreen widget-driven interface.[14] The ViewTouch point of sale software was first shown by its developer, Gene Mosher, at Fall Comdex, 1986, in Las Vegas, Nevada to visitors at the Atari Computer demonstration area and was the first commercially available POS system with a widget-driven color graphic touch screen interface.

Eugene Mosher ViewTouch founder at Atari booth Fall Comdex '86, introducing the World's first graphic point of sale software solution

   

  • 1990

    Elographics Isnc Monitor Mouse

    John Carlson presented to the Commuter Chronicles the Monitor Mouse from Elograpics Ins. Thanks to the Elograpics's touch screen overly it was possible to interact with Windows! In the show Carlson was palyng solitarie with his finger!

John Carlson playing Windows solitaire with finghers in the TV Show Computer Chronicles - season 1990

   

Microtouch Systems

In the same episode of the show, Dick Harrison introduced the Microtouch System's overlay for Macintosh.

What Multituch System did was to create a suite of application custom made for the finger interaction. The example was a point of sale application where the user was able to interact with the software in a natural way.

Dick Harrison Interactin with the first NUI application ever developed

   

  • 1993

    Simon Personal Communicator

    In 1993, IBM and BellSouth teamed up to launch the Simon Personal Communicator, one of the first cellphones with touchscreen technology. It featured paging capabilities, an e-mail and calendar application, an appointment schedule, an address book, a calculator, and a pen-based sketchpad. It also had a resistive touchscreen that required the use of a stylus to navigate through menus and to input data.

First version of Simon Personal Communicator

  

   

MessagePad 100

Apple also launched a touchscreen PDA device that year: the Newton PDA. Though the Newton platform had begun in 1987, the MessagePad was the first in the series of devices from Apple to use the platform. As Time notes, Apple's CEO at the time, John Sculley, actually coined the term "PDA" (or "personal digital assistant"). Like IBM's Simon Personal Communicator, the MessagePad 100 featured handwriting recognition software and was controlled with a stylus.

Early reviews of the MessagePad focused on its useful features. Once it got into the hands of consumers, however, its shortcomings became more apparent. The handwriting recognition software didn't work too well, and the Newton didn't sell that many units. That didn't stop Apple, though; the company made the Newton for six more years, ending with the MP2000.

First version of the Apple Message Pad

   

  • 1996

    Palm Pilot

    Palm Computing followed suit with its own PDA, dubbed the Pilot. It was the first of the company's many generations of personal digital assistants. Like the other touchscreen gadgets that preceded it, the Palm 1000 and Pilot 5000 required the use of a stylus.

    Palm's PDA gadget had a bit more success than IBM and Apple's offerings. Its name soon became synonymous with the word "business," helped in part by the fact that its handwriting recognition software worked very well. Users used what Palm called "Graffiti" to input text, numbers, and other characters. It was simple to learn and mimicked how a person writes on a piece of paper. It was eventually implemented over to the Apple Newton platform.

    PDA-type devices didn't necessarily feature the finger-to-screen type of touchscreens that we're used to today, but consumer adoption convinced the companies that there was enough interest in owning this type of device.

First version of PalPilot

  

   

  • 2005

    TouchLight

    It is an imaging touch screen and 3D display for gesture-based interaction. It was developed by Microsoft Research employee Andrew D. Wilson and made known to the public in late 2005. The technology was licensed to Eon Reality in July 2006.

  

  

   

  • 2006

    Jef Han Multitouch technologies at ted 2006 à Perceptive Pixel

     

Philips Entertaible

Is an entertainment device revealed in the 2006 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) that consists of a digital board game using a 30-inch LCD touch screen.

Pilips Entertaible on stage

   

  • 2007

    AudioCube

    In January 2007, the AudioCubes were launched on the market] and offered online on the website of Percussa,[4] the company which Bert Schiettecatte founded in October 2004 to further develop and commercialize the AudioCubes.

    The concept of the AudioCubes was first presented by Bert Schiettecatte in April 2004 at the CHI2004 conference in Vienna. A first prototype of the AudioCubes was shown at the Museum for Contemporary Art, MUHKA in Antwerp in December 2004. They were used in an art installation created in collaboration with Peter Swinnen during the Champ D'Action Time Canvas festival.

    The AudioCubes are a collection of wireless intelligent light emitting objects, capable of detecting each other's location and orientation, and user gestures, and were created by Bert Schiettecatte. They are an electronic musical instrument which is being used by electronic musicians for live performance, sound design, music composition, and creating interactive applications in max/msp, pd and C++. The AudioCubes are an example of a Tangible User Interface as well as an ambient device.

  

   

iPhone

Development of what was to become the iPhone began in 2004, when Apple started to gather a team of 1000 employees to work on the highly confidential "Project Purple", including Jonathan Ive, the designer behind the iPhone.Apple CEO Steve Jobs steered the original focus away from a tablet, like the iPad, and towards a phone. Apple created the device during a secretive collaboration with AT&T Mobility—Cingular Wireless at the time—at an estimated development cost of US$150 million over thirty months.

Jobs unveiled the iPhone to the public on January 9, 2007, at the Macworld 2007 convention at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The two initial models, a 4 GB model priced at US$ 499 and an 8 GB model at US$ 599, went on sale in the United States on June 29, 2007, at 6:00 pm local time, while hundreds of customers lined up outside the stores nationwide.The passionate reaction to the launch of the iPhone resulted in sections of the media dubbing it the 'Jesus phone'. Following this successful release in the US, the first generation iPhone was made available in the UK, France, and Germany in November 2007, and Ireland and Austria in the spring of 2008

iPhone 1st generation

   

  • 2008

    Microsoft Surface

    April 17, 2008 : The preliminary launch – the Microsoft Surface became available for customer in AT&T stores
    2001 : Stevie Bathiche of Microsoft Hardware and Andy Wilson of Microsoft Research developed an idea for an interactive table that could understand the manipulation of physical pieces and a team was formed for the development of the idea.

    2003 : The team presented the idea to Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman. The first prototype was born and nicknamed "T1". The evolution of Surface had begun. A variety of early applications were also built, including pinball, a photo browser and a video puzzle. As more applications were developed, the team saw the value of the surface computer beyond simply gaming and began to favor those applications that took advantage of the unique ability of Surface to recognize physical objects placed on the table. The team was also beginning to realize that surface computing could be applied to a number of different embodiments and form factors.

    2004 : A number of different experimental prototypes were built including "the tub" model, which was encased in a rounded plastic shell, a desk-height model with a square top and cloth-covered sides.

    2005 : The final hardware design seen today was finalized.

    May 29, 2007 : The Microsoft Surface was announced in front of the world at D5 conference.

    April 17, 2008 : The preliminary launch – the Microsoft Surface became available for customer in AT&T stores.

T1 Prototype

"Tub" model prototype

  

  

   

Microsoft Surface V1

  

     

CUBIT

It is an open source multi-touch system designed by Stefan Hechenberger and Addie Wagenknecht for Nortd Labs. It was developed to "demystify multitouch" technology through making its software and hardware open source and is a direct competitor of Microsoft PixelSense[

As of May 2, 2008 they are accepting orders for developer kits which they call the TouchKit. Users can purchase the Touchkit so long as they supply their own projector/camera at a cost estimated to be between $1080 and $1,580 USD. [4][5]

The CUBIT system currently is for sale by commission basis only and both are rumored to have a two to three month waiting list

Cubit concept

   

DiamondTouch

The DiamondTouch table is a multi-touch, interactive PC interface product from Circle Twelve Inc. It is a human interface device that has the capability of allowing multiple people to interact simultaneously while identifying which person is touching where. The technology was originally developed at Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories (MERL) in 2001 and later licensed to Circle Twelve Inc in 2008

  

   

   

Multi-pointer X (MPX)

To be added

   

  • 2009

    Sifteo Cubes

    The original Sifteo cubes evolved from Siftables, a working prototype technology developed by David Merrill and Jeevan Kalanithi at the MIT Media Lab. The Siftables prototype was previewed at the TED Conference in February 2009. After leaving the Media Lab, Merrill and Kalanithi founded Sifteo, Inc. to manufacture and market the original Sifteo cubes.

    Sifteo, Inc. debuted Sifteo cubes at the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, at which the original Sifteo cubes were named an International CES Innovations 2011 Design and Engineering Awards Honoree. The company began distribution of the original Sifteo cubes in September 2011. The product's successor, Sifteo Cubes Interactive Game System, was announced on August 30, 2012 and began shipping on November 23, 2012.

  

   

  • 2010

    iPad

    Apple co-founder Steve Jobs said in a 1983 speech that Apple's

    .."strategy is really simple. What we want to do is we want to put an incredibly great computer in a book that you can carry around with you and learn how to use in 20 minutes ... and we really want to do it with a radio link in it so you don't have to hook up to anything and you're in communication with all of these larger databases and other computers."

    Apple re-entered the mobile-computing markets in 2007 with the iPhone. Smaller than the iPad, but featuring a camera and mobile phone, it pioneered the multi-touch finger-sensitive touchscreen interface of Apple's iOS mobile operating system. By late 2009, the iPad's release had been rumored for several years. Such speculation mostly talked about "Apple's tablet"; specific names included iTablet and iSlate.The iPad was announced on January 27, 2010, by Jobs at an Apple press conference at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.

    He later said that Apple had begun developing the iPad before the iPhone, but had temporarily shelved the effort upon realizing that its ideas would work just as well in a mobile phone. The iPad's internal codename was K48, which was revealed in the court case surrounding leaking of iPad information before launch.

    Apple began taking pre-orders for the first-generation iPad from American customers on March 12, 2010

         

  • 2011

    PixelSense

    Microsoft PixelSense (formerly called Microsoft Surface) is an interactive surface computing platform that allows one or more people to use touch and real world objects, and share digital content at the same time. The PixelSense platform consists of software and hardware products that combine vision based multitouch PC hardware, 360-degree multiuser application design, and Windows software to create a natural user interface (NUI).

    Microsoft and Samsung partnered to announce the current version of PixelSense, the Samsung SUR40 for Microsoft Surface ("SUR40"), at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in 2011.Samsung began shipping the new SUR40 hardware with the Microsoft Surface 2.0 software platform to customers in early 2012.

    Samsung discontinued production of the SUR40 PixelSense display in June 2013.

  

Samsung SUR40 with Microsoft PixelSense

   

   

     

Omnitouch

It is a wearable computer, depth-sensing camera and projection system that enables interactive multitouch interfaces on everyday surface. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or the environment. For example, the present shoulder-worn implementation allows users to manipulate interfaces projected onto the environment (e.g., walls, tables), held objects (e.g., notepads, books), and their own bodies (e.g., hands, lap). On such surfaces - without any calibration - OmniTouch provides capabilities similar to that of a touchscreen: X and Y location in 2D interfaces and whether fingers are "clicked" or hovering. This enables a wide variety of applications, similar to what one might find on a modern smartphone. A user study assessing pointing accuracy of the system (user and system inaccuracies combined) suggested buttons needed to be 2.3 cm in diameter to achieve reliable operation on the hand, 1.6 cm on walls. This is approaching the accuracy of capacitive touchscreens, like those found in smart phones, but on arbitrary surfaces.

OmniTouch was developed by polla researchers from Microsoft Research and Carnegie Mellon University in 2011. The work was accepted to and presented at the prestigious 2011 ACM User Interface and Software Technology conference. Many major news outlets and online tech blogs covered the technology.

It is conceptually similar to efforts such as Skinput and SixthSense. A central contribution of the work was a novel depth-driven, fuzzy template matching approach to finger tracking and click registration. The system also finds and tracks surfaces suitable for projection, on which interactive applications can be projected.

Onmitouch used at Microsft research Lab

   

  • 2012

    Microsoft Surface

    Surface RT launched alongside the general availability release of Windows 8 on October 26, 2012. Surface Pro became available on February 9, 2013. Surface devices were initially available only at Microsoft Stores and online, it was later expanded into other vendors.[35]

    At the June 2012 unveiling event, Steven Sinofsky, President of the Windows and Windows Live Division, stated that pricing for Surface RT "[would] be comparable to other ARM devices" and pricing for Surface Pro "[would] be comparable to current ultrabooks." In a recent interview with the Seattle Times, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer responded to the question about Surface pricing stating that the "sweet spot" for the bulk of the PC market was $300 to $800, but did not detail any more specifics.[36] On October 16, pricing was revealed for Surface RT,[37] and pre-orders opened to ship, "for delivery by 10/26".[38]

     

  • 2014

    Perceptive Pixel by Microsoft

     

  • 2015

    Microsoft HoloLens

    With the Windows 10 event happened on 21th January 2015 Microsoft announced it's new operating system and also a device called Microsoft HoloLens. Holographic computing will dramatically change the way people will interact with computers, like mouse-based interface did in the 1990s, touch interfaces did after the introduction of the iPhone in 2007 and Kinect did in 2010.

 

Microsoft Surface Hub

With the Windows 10 event happened on 21th January 2015 Microsoft announced it's new operating system and also a device called Microsoft Surface Hub. This device is the new multitopuch multiuser device from Microsoft used for collaborative solutions

     

Entertaible 48

IO2 Technology's Heliodisplay M3 display

Tangible Table based interface

Reactable: A multi-user electro-acoustic music instrument

IBM's Everywhere Interactive Displays

iBar multitouch touchscreen

Touch Technologies Timeline

In this post I'll try to enumerate all the touch technologies by year, it is an hard work and is still in progress so if you want to contribute just ping me at gianpaolo.santopaolo {at} softwarelab.it

   

  • 1965

E.A. Johnson described his work on capacitive touch screens in a short article which is published in 1965

"Touch Display - A novel input/output device for computers".. doi:10.1049/el:19650200.

     

  • 1967

Johnson in an article published in described more fully his toughts with photographs and diagrams

"Touch Displays: A Programmed Man-Machine Interface". doi:10.1080/00140136708930868 

Johnson, 1967

   

  • 1968

A description of the applicability of the touch technology for air traffic control was described in an article published in 1968.

Orr, N.W.; Hopkins, V.D. (1968). "The Role of Touch Display in Air Traffic Control". The Controller 7: 7–9.

   

  • 1972

At the University of Illinois a new system named PLATO IV was ready for operation. The PLATO IV terminal was a major innovation. It included Bitzer's orange plasma display invention which incorporated both memory and bitmapped graphics into one display. This plasma display included fast vector line drawing capability and ran at 1260 baud, rendering 60 lines or 180 characters per second. The display was a 512×512 bitmap, with both character and vector plotting done by hardwired logic. Users could provide their own characters to support rudimentary bitmap graphics. Compressed air powered a piston-driven microfiche image selector that permitted colored images to be projected on the back of the screen under program control. The PLATO IV display also included a 16×16 grid infrared touch panel allowing students to answer questions by touching anywhere on the screen.

It was developed for the PLATO Computer Assisted Instruction system, which was deployed in schools throughout the state. The technology was commercialized by Carroll Touch. which was founded in 1973.

The PLATO IV touchscreen terminal.

   

  • 1973

Frank Beck and Bent Stumpe, engineers from CERN, developed a transparent touch screen in the early 1970s and it was manufactured by CERN and put to use in 1973. This touchscreen was based on Bent Stumpe's work at a television factory in the early 1960s.

The prototype x-y mutual capacitance touchscreen (left) developed at CERN in 1977

The self-capacitance screen (right), also developed by Stumpe at CERN

The prototype x-y mutual capacitance touchscreen (left) developed at CERN in 1977 by Bent Stumpe, a Danish electronics engineer, for the control room of CERN's accelerator SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron). This was a further development of the self-capacitance screen (right), also developed by Stumpe at CERN in 1972.

   

  • 1975

A resistive touch screen was developed by American inventor G. Samuel Hurst who received US patent #3,911,215 on Oct. 7, 1975. The first version was produced in 1982.

The company was the Elographics, Inc

First generation of AccuTouch curved touchscreen from EloTouch.

   

   

  • 1982

Multi-touch technology began in 1982, when the University of Toronto's Input Research Group developed the first human-input multi-touch system, using a frosted-glass panel with a camera placed behind the glass. In 1985, the University of Toronto group including Bill Buxton developed a multi-touch tablet that used capacitance rather than bulky camera-based optical sensing systems

Multitouch tablet concept

   

The Natural User Interface Era

Bill Buxton's project is definitely the start of the Natural User Interface era even if the term NUI have to wait more than 15 years before to be heard.In my memory and in my research this is definitely the firs NUI application ever developed.

   

  • 1983

The HP-150 from 1983 was one of the world's earliest commercial touchscreen computers. Similar to the PLATO IV system , the touch technology used employed infrared transmitters and receivers mounted around the bezel of its 9" Sony Cathode Ray Tube (CRT), which detected the position of any non-transparent object on the screen.

HP 150

   

  • 1986

    The first graphical point of sale software was demonstrated on the 16-bit Atari 520ST color computer in 1986. It featured a color touchscreen widget-driven interface.[14] The ViewTouch point of sale software was first shown by its developer, Gene Mosher, at Fall Comdex, 1986, in Las Vegas, Nevada to visitors at the Atari Computer demonstration area and was the first commercially available POS system with a widget-driven color graphic touch screen interface.

Eugene Mosher ViewTouch founder at Atari booth Fall Comdex '86, introducing the World's first graphic point of sale software solution

   

  • 1990

    Elographics Isnc Monitor Mouse

    John Carlson presented to the Commuter Chronicles the Monitor Mouse from Elograpics Ins. Thanks to the Elograpics's touch screen overly it was possible to interact with Windows! In the show Carlson was palyng solitarie with his finger!

John Carlson playing Windows solitaire with finghers in the TV Show Computer Chronicles - season 1990

   

Microtouch Systems

In the same episode of the show, Dick Harrison introduced the Microtouch System's overlay for Macintosh.

What Multituch System did was to create a suite of application custom made for the finger interaction. The example was a point of sale application where the user was able to interact with the software in a natural way.

Dick Harrison Interactin with the first NUI application ever developed

   

  • 1993

    Simon Personal Communicator

    In 1993, IBM and BellSouth teamed up to launch the Simon Personal Communicator, one of the first cellphones with touchscreen technology. It featured paging capabilities, an e-mail and calendar application, an appointment schedule, an address book, a calculator, and a pen-based sketchpad. It also had a resistive touchscreen that required the use of a stylus to navigate through menus and to input data.

First version of Simon Personal Communicator

  

   

MessagePad 100

Apple also launched a touchscreen PDA device that year: the Newton PDA. Though the Newton platform had begun in 1987, the MessagePad was the first in the series of devices from Apple to use the platform. As Time notes, Apple's CEO at the time, John Sculley, actually coined the term "PDA" (or "personal digital assistant"). Like IBM's Simon Personal Communicator, the MessagePad 100 featured handwriting recognition software and was controlled with a stylus.

Early reviews of the MessagePad focused on its useful features. Once it got into the hands of consumers, however, its shortcomings became more apparent. The handwriting recognition software didn't work too well, and the Newton didn't sell that many units. That didn't stop Apple, though; the company made the Newton for six more years, ending with the MP2000.

First version of the Apple Message Pad

   

  • 1996

    Palm Pilot

    Palm Computing followed suit with its own PDA, dubbed the Pilot. It was the first of the company's many generations of personal digital assistants. Like the other touchscreen gadgets that preceded it, the Palm 1000 and Pilot 5000 required the use of a stylus.

    Palm's PDA gadget had a bit more success than IBM and Apple's offerings. Its name soon became synonymous with the word "business," helped in part by the fact that its handwriting recognition software worked very well. Users used what Palm called "Graffiti" to input text, numbers, and other characters. It was simple to learn and mimicked how a person writes on a piece of paper. It was eventually implemented over to the Apple Newton platform.

    PDA-type devices didn't necessarily feature the finger-to-screen type of touchscreens that we're used to today, but consumer adoption convinced the companies that there was enough interest in owning this type of device.

First version of PalPilot

  

   

  • 2005

    TouchLight

    It is an imaging touch screen and 3D display for gesture-based interaction. It was developed by Microsoft Research employee Andrew D. Wilson and made known to the public in late 2005. The technology was licensed to Eon Reality in July 2006.

  

  

   

  • 2006

    Jef Han Multitouch technologies at ted 2006 à Perceptive Pixel

     

Philips Entertaible

Is an entertainment device revealed in the 2006 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) that consists of a digital board game using a 30-inch LCD touch screen.

Pilips Entertaible on stage

   

  • 2007

    AudioCube

    In January 2007, the AudioCubes were launched on the market] and offered online on the website of Percussa,[4] the company which Bert Schiettecatte founded in October 2004 to further develop and commercialize the AudioCubes.

    The concept of the AudioCubes was first presented by Bert Schiettecatte in April 2004 at the CHI2004 conference in Vienna. A first prototype of the AudioCubes was shown at the Museum for Contemporary Art, MUHKA in Antwerp in December 2004. They were used in an art installation created in collaboration with Peter Swinnen during the Champ D'Action Time Canvas festival.

    The AudioCubes are a collection of wireless intelligent light emitting objects, capable of detecting each other's location and orientation, and user gestures, and were created by Bert Schiettecatte. They are an electronic musical instrument which is being used by electronic musicians for live performance, sound design, music composition, and creating interactive applications in max/msp, pd and C++. The AudioCubes are an example of a Tangible User Interface as well as an ambient device.

  

   

iPhone

Development of what was to become the iPhone began in 2004, when Apple started to gather a team of 1000 employees to work on the highly confidential "Project Purple", including Jonathan Ive, the designer behind the iPhone.Apple CEO Steve Jobs steered the original focus away from a tablet, like the iPad, and towards a phone. Apple created the device during a secretive collaboration with AT&T Mobility—Cingular Wireless at the time—at an estimated development cost of US$150 million over thirty months.

Jobs unveiled the iPhone to the public on January 9, 2007, at the Macworld 2007 convention at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The two initial models, a 4 GB model priced at US$ 499 and an 8 GB model at US$ 599, went on sale in the United States on June 29, 2007, at 6:00 pm local time, while hundreds of customers lined up outside the stores nationwide.The passionate reaction to the launch of the iPhone resulted in sections of the media dubbing it the 'Jesus phone'. Following this successful release in the US, the first generation iPhone was made available in the UK, France, and Germany in November 2007, and Ireland and Austria in the spring of 2008

iPhone 1st generation

   

  • 2008

    Microsoft Surface

    April 17, 2008 : The preliminary launch – the Microsoft Surface became available for customer in AT&T stores
    2001 : Stevie Bathiche of Microsoft Hardware and Andy Wilson of Microsoft Research developed an idea for an interactive table that could understand the manipulation of physical pieces and a team was formed for the development of the idea.

    2003 : The team presented the idea to Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman. The first prototype was born and nicknamed "T1". The evolution of Surface had begun. A variety of early applications were also built, including pinball, a photo browser and a video puzzle. As more applications were developed, the team saw the value of the surface computer beyond simply gaming and began to favor those applications that took advantage of the unique ability of Surface to recognize physical objects placed on the table. The team was also beginning to realize that surface computing could be applied to a number of different embodiments and form factors.

    2004 : A number of different experimental prototypes were built including "the tub" model, which was encased in a rounded plastic shell, a desk-height model with a square top and cloth-covered sides.

    2005 : The final hardware design seen today was finalized.

    May 29, 2007 : The Microsoft Surface was announced in front of the world at D5 conference.

    April 17, 2008 : The preliminary launch – the Microsoft Surface became available for customer in AT&T stores.

T1 Prototype

"Tub" model prototype

  

  

   

Microsoft Surface V1

  

     

CUBIT

It is an open source multi-touch system designed by Stefan Hechenberger and Addie Wagenknecht for Nortd Labs. It was developed to "demystify multitouch" technology through making its software and hardware open source and is a direct competitor of Microsoft PixelSense[

As of May 2, 2008 they are accepting orders for developer kits which they call the TouchKit. Users can purchase the Touchkit so long as they supply their own projector/camera at a cost estimated to be between $1080 and $1,580 USD. [4][5]

The CUBIT system currently is for sale by commission basis only and both are rumored to have a two to three month waiting list

Cubit concept

   

DiamondTouch

The DiamondTouch table is a multi-touch, interactive PC interface product from Circle Twelve Inc. It is a human interface device that has the capability of allowing multiple people to interact simultaneously while identifying which person is touching where. The technology was originally developed at Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories (MERL) in 2001 and later licensed to Circle Twelve Inc in 2008

  

   

   

Multi-pointer X (MPX)

To be added

   

  • 2009

    Sifteo Cubes

    The original Sifteo cubes evolved from Siftables, a working prototype technology developed by David Merrill and Jeevan Kalanithi at the MIT Media Lab. The Siftables prototype was previewed at the TED Conference in February 2009. After leaving the Media Lab, Merrill and Kalanithi founded Sifteo, Inc. to manufacture and market the original Sifteo cubes.

    Sifteo, Inc. debuted Sifteo cubes at the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, at which the original Sifteo cubes were named an International CES Innovations 2011 Design and Engineering Awards Honoree. The company began distribution of the original Sifteo cubes in September 2011. The product's successor, Sifteo Cubes Interactive Game System, was announced on August 30, 2012 and began shipping on November 23, 2012.

  

   

  • 2010

    iPad

    Apple co-founder Steve Jobs said in a 1983 speech that Apple's

    .."strategy is really simple. What we want to do is we want to put an incredibly great computer in a book that you can carry around with you and learn how to use in 20 minutes ... and we really want to do it with a radio link in it so you don't have to hook up to anything and you're in communication with all of these larger databases and other computers."

    Apple re-entered the mobile-computing markets in 2007 with the iPhone. Smaller than the iPad, but featuring a camera and mobile phone, it pioneered the multi-touch finger-sensitive touchscreen interface of Apple's iOS mobile operating system. By late 2009, the iPad's release had been rumored for several years. Such speculation mostly talked about "Apple's tablet"; specific names included iTablet and iSlate.The iPad was announced on January 27, 2010, by Jobs at an Apple press conference at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.

    He later said that Apple had begun developing the iPad before the iPhone, but had temporarily shelved the effort upon realizing that its ideas would work just as well in a mobile phone. The iPad's internal codename was K48, which was revealed in the court case surrounding leaking of iPad information before launch.

    Apple began taking pre-orders for the first-generation iPad from American customers on March 12, 2010

         

  • 2011

    PixelSense

    Microsoft PixelSense (formerly called Microsoft Surface) is an interactive surface computing platform that allows one or more people to use touch and real world objects, and share digital content at the same time. The PixelSense platform consists of software and hardware products that combine vision based multitouch PC hardware, 360-degree multiuser application design, and Windows software to create a natural user interface (NUI).

    Microsoft and Samsung partnered to announce the current version of PixelSense, the Samsung SUR40 for Microsoft Surface ("SUR40"), at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in 2011.Samsung began shipping the new SUR40 hardware with the Microsoft Surface 2.0 software platform to customers in early 2012.

    Samsung discontinued production of the SUR40 PixelSense display in June 2013.

  

Samsung SUR40 with Microsoft PixelSense

   

   

     

Omnitouch

It is a wearable computer, depth-sensing camera and projection system that enables interactive multitouch interfaces on everyday surface. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or the environment. For example, the present shoulder-worn implementation allows users to manipulate interfaces projected onto the environment (e.g., walls, tables), held objects (e.g., notepads, books), and their own bodies (e.g., hands, lap). On such surfaces - without any calibration - OmniTouch provides capabilities similar to that of a touchscreen: X and Y location in 2D interfaces and whether fingers are "clicked" or hovering. This enables a wide variety of applications, similar to what one might find on a modern smartphone. A user study assessing pointing accuracy of the system (user and system inaccuracies combined) suggested buttons needed to be 2.3 cm in diameter to achieve reliable operation on the hand, 1.6 cm on walls. This is approaching the accuracy of capacitive touchscreens, like those found in smart phones, but on arbitrary surfaces.

OmniTouch was developed by polla researchers from Microsoft Research and Carnegie Mellon University in 2011. The work was accepted to and presented at the prestigious 2011 ACM User Interface and Software Technology conference. Many major news outlets and online tech blogs covered the technology.

It is conceptually similar to efforts such as Skinput and SixthSense. A central contribution of the work was a novel depth-driven, fuzzy template matching approach to finger tracking and click registration. The system also finds and tracks surfaces suitable for projection, on which interactive applications can be projected.

Onmitouch used at Microsft research Lab

   

  • 2012

    Microsoft Surface

    Surface RT launched alongside the general availability release of Windows 8 on October 26, 2012. Surface Pro became available on February 9, 2013. Surface devices were initially available only at Microsoft Stores and online, it was later expanded into other vendors.[35]

    At the June 2012 unveiling event, Steven Sinofsky, President of the Windows and Windows Live Division, stated that pricing for Surface RT "[would] be comparable to other ARM devices" and pricing for Surface Pro "[would] be comparable to current ultrabooks." In a recent interview with the Seattle Times, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer responded to the question about Surface pricing stating that the "sweet spot" for the bulk of the PC market was $300 to $800, but did not detail any more specifics.[36] On October 16, pricing was revealed for Surface RT,[37] and pre-orders opened to ship, "for delivery by 10/26".[38]

     

  • 2014

    Perceptive Pixel by Microsoft

     

  • 2015

    Microsoft HoloLens

    With the Windows 10 event happened on 21th January 2015 Microsoft announced it's new operating system and also a device called Microsoft HoloLens. Holographic computing will dramatically change the way people will interact with computers, like mouse-based interface did in the 1990s, touch interfaces did after the introduction of the iPhone in 2007 and Kinect did in 2010.

 

Microsoft Surface Hub

With the Windows 10 event happened on 21th January 2015 Microsoft announced it's new operating system and also a device called Microsoft Surface Hub. This device is the new multitopuch multiuser device from Microsoft used for collaborative solutions

     

Entertaible 48

IO2 Technology's Heliodisplay M3 display

Tangible Table based interface

Reactable: A multi-user electro-acoustic music instrument

IBM's Everywhere Interactive Displays

iBar multitouch touchscreen

Enlarging the Windows 8 onscreen keyboard

If you are experiencing problems in using the on-screen keyboard on a pc running Windows 8 connected with a Perceptive Pixel by Microsoft device or on any other larger format multitouch displays.

If, when you use the touch keyboard on the screen, you encounter the following issues:

  • The size of the displayed touch keyboard is too small for typing.
  • You experience missed key entries when you touch the keys.

This could occurs because the MonitorSize value in the following registry key is not set correctly:

HKLM\software\microsoft\windows\currentversion\explorer\scaling

Note: This type of registry value is a REG_SZ string. You can set a decimal value to this string, such as 22.5.

You can find an hot fix for this issue on the Microsoft Support Site.

   

  

Introducing your personal digital assistant: Cortana

Microsoft's upcoming Windows Phone 8.1 update will include Cortana, the personal digital assistant.

This brand new feature takes its name from Halo game series where Cortana provides backstory and tactical information to the player. In the story, she is instrumental in preventing the activation of the Halo installations, which would have destroyed all sentient life in the galaxy.

Cortana is here to make your life a little easier

Tap and hold the search button to ask something such as "Tell me about yourself"

You will get Cortana's introduction: "In short I'm your personal assistant. I try to make things easier to do on your phone"

If you didn't turn on Cortana when you set up your phone go to settings and swap to applications to do it now by tapping "Cortana"

Now let's launch Cortana you will get a screen like the one below.

In the notebook Cortana keep tracks of what you tell her about yourself. You can go there and:

  • Set Interests, add new interest and to tell Cortana how to take you informed
  • Manage Remind me, here you find all the reminder you ask Cortana to do for you
  • Set Quiet hours, here you can configure when and how Cortana and others can interact with you
  • Manage the Inner circle, here you can define who can interact with you even in the quiet hours
  • Set your Places, here you instruct Cortana about your life and your preferred / abitual places so then you can ask Cortan to check the traffic status to reach work (after you defined work as a place) or home
  • Manage your Music searches, Cortana can help you figure out what song is playing, whether you're in your car or at the bar, and then help you get that song in Xbox Music
  • Manage your Settings, one advantage of a digital personal assistant is that she won't take it personally if you want to adjust her settings and how she works. You can get to Cortana's settings on your Windows

 

 

Cortana can help take care of everyday stuff on your phone: Call someone is simple as same just hold the search button and say: "Call Anna", Cortana will call Anna (a name in your contacts) for you.

Sending a text it would be really easy, just hold the search button wait for Cortana to listen you and say :"Text Anna, I love you". She will create the sms for you and will come back to you saying: "All right I'll text Anna I love you. Send it or add more". Just answer: "Send it" and she will send the message for you.

Once Cortana knows how she can help you, she can check your favorite team score, alert you on your flight delay or see how the weather looks like on the other side of the world.

 

What can I say/ask to Cortana?

When you press and hold the Search icon button, Cortana will begin listening, no matter what you're doing on your phone, even while the phone is locked.

You can start by talking naturally to Cortana about whatever you have in mind. If you're not sure what to say, don't worry—she'll often understand you if you say things the same way you'd say them to any person. If Cortana isn't sure what you mean, she can usually help you figure out how to say things in a way she'll understand.

Task

Some ideas to get started

Phone

Make a call to mama at home

Call Anna

Call Anna on speakerphone

Call Anna, home

Chat

How old are you?

Where are you from?

Tell me a joke

Texting

Text dad

Message Anna

Text Anna I love you

Reminders

Remind me to pick up my dry cleaning tomorrow

Remind me to water the plants when I get home

Next time I'm at the grocery store, remind me to buy bananas (if Cortana isn't sure which one you mean, she'll ask)

When Jordana calls, remind me to congratulate her on her new column

Remind me to call Luther when I leave work

Calendar

Put swimming on my calendar for tomorrow

Change my 4 PM event to 5

What do I have next?

What's happening this weekend?

Weather

Will it rain this weekend?

Is it cold out?

Should I wear a coat?

What's the weather today?

What's the forecast for next week?

Is it hot in Paris right now?

Alarms

Wake me up at 7 AM

Set an alarm for 6:30 AM

Turn off my 4 PM alarm

Wake me up in 4 hours

Notes

Take a note

Note: left my car on level 4

Take a note: find birdwatching book for Dad's birthday

Music

Play [artists]

Put on [playlist]

Start playing [song]

Play some jazz

Play [album]

What song is playing?

Maps and directions

Get me directions to the Grand Canyon

Where am I?

How long will it take me to get to the Space Needle?

Show me a map of 123 Main Street

How far to Four Corners National Park?

What's traffic like on the way to work?

Places to go

Is there a Starbucks near me?

Find a cheap pizza place that's open now

Show me highly rated restaurants nearby

Is [place] open on weekends?

Facts

Who is the tallest woman in the world?

Who is the prime minister of Italy?

What's the capital of Brazil?

Flights

What's the status of Alaska Airlines flight 628?

Is Qantas flight 16 on time?

Sports

Latest Soccer scores?

Latest Inter's score

When was the last Seahawks game?

Finance

Convert 67 euros to dollars

How much is a Microsoft share?

How many dollars in an euro?

How did the Italian markets do?

 

You can also go in the store looking for application that supports Cortana to extend her functionalities, for instance, do you want to ask Cortana what time is it so she would be able to answer you? Just install Voice Time and Cortana will be able to say you what time it is when you'll ask.

 

Halo related questions

As said Cortana comes from Halo game series, to make things a bit ironic she will answer you to some Halo related questions J Here is a list of questions I found online that Cortana will respond to, however, I am sure, others can find other question that Cortana will answer:

  • Do you know what Master Chief is doing?
  • What is Master Chief doing?
  • I thought you were dead
  • Didn't you die?
  • Where is master chief?
  • What is rampancy?
  • Tell me about rampancy
  • Tell me about Halo 5?
  • Tell me about Dr. Halsey?
  • Tell me about Elites
  • What do you know about Halo 5?
  • Tell me about Catherine Halsey
  • What do you know about Dr. Halsey?
  • What is Elites?
  • Tell me about Grunts
  • Are you the cortana from Halo?
  • What do you know about Elites
  • Are you dating Master Chief?
  • What do you know about Grunts
  • Tell me about Hunters
  • Tell me the story of Halo 5?
  • What is Master Chief up to?
  • What do you know about Hunters
  • Are you in love with Master Chief?
  • Are you really Cortana?
  • Do you love Master Chief?
  • What do you know about Jackals
  • Tell me about Jackals
  • Tell me the story of Halo?
  • Will you be reborn in Halo 5?
  • Will you resurrect in Halo 5?
  • What is Master Chief's last name?
  • Will you come back in Halo 5?
  • Do you Master Chief's last name?
  • What is the story of Halo?
  • Are you in Halo 5?
  • Do you know Jen Taylor?
  • What do you know about Catherine Halsey?
 
  • Who is Catherine Halsey?
  • Are you the same Cortana from Halo?
  • What do you know about Hunters
  • Did you really die?
  • Tell me about Prophets
  • Who is Dr. Halsey?
  • Tell me about Buggers
  • Tell me about Brutes
  • Tell me about Prometheans
  • What is the story of Halo 5?
  • What do you know about Buggers
  • Tell me about Crawlers
  • Tell me about Watchers
  • Tell me about the Didact
  • What do you know about the didact
  • What do you know about Brutes
  • Tell me about Guilty Spark
  • Tell me about Knights
  • Tell me about the Librarian
  • What do you know about the Librarian
  • What you know about the flood
  • What do you know about Guilty Spark
  • Which is your favorite Halo?
  • What is your favorite Halo?
  • What is favorite Halo game?
  • Which is your favorite Halo game?
  • Tell me about Halo?
  • Tell me about beamish
  • What do you know about Halo?
  • Tell me about hamish beamish
  • Tell me about hamish beamish
  • Why are you blue in color?
  • Aren't you dead?
  • Why are you blue?
  • Which Halo game do you like the most?
  • What do you know about beamish
  • What do you know about hamish
  • What do you know about Hamish Beamish

 

Conclusion

Cortana isn't just about work, she's always listening at you try asking a casual question such as "Where do you came from?"

The best thing you can do to learn about Cortana is talk to her, you may be surprised by how she can help you and what she has to say!

When I said her (the first time) "text Anna I love You" she also asked me "Is Anna your partner? I can better help you I I know you better" Wow! That is really awesome!

And in the last my vision: I see a world where Cortana will be our personal digital assistant everywhere in our devices:

  • PC
  • Tablet
  • Phone
  • Perceptive Pixel by Microsoft

If I login with my Microsoft account my personal Cortana with her knowledge about me, she already knows who my partner is, will assist me in my everyday life trying making it a bit better.

 

Notes

Cortana is only available on phones with Windows Phone 8.1, and in some countries/regions (check availability). Check to see which software version you have and find out if an update is available.

You can also check when the update will be available in your country by clicking here.

If Cortana isn't available, or you don't want to use it, you can still use the Speech functionality on your phone.

Keyboards? Where we’re going we don’t need any keyboards!

Just some day ago I posted about my birthday and I discovered another big fan of Back to the Future in my new company (I will tell you something more about my new company as soon I'll get the rights to do it).

I'm working together with Michael, a really nice guy of the marketing stuff, on creating all the stuff to start offering touch related services and products …. What there is better than mixing up our beloved Back to the Future and touch technologies

Keyboards? …. Where we are going we don't need keyboards!

 

Ultimi Post

Discalmer

Articles and content of this blog aren't and shouldn't be interpreted as professional advice or opinions. Author writes on a personal basis and as part of their own research, experimentation and knowledge. Opinions expressed aren't in any way attributable to professional affiliations / institutional thereof or to opinions that the author express as part of their roles / positions that may be quite different from that reported here.